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dc.contributor.authorEshitera, E E
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-15T10:09:46Z
dc.date.issued2011-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://erepository.uonbi.ac.ke:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/14070
dc.description.abstractThe present study was conducted in the year 2010 in Homa Bay District to investigate the status of T. solium cysticercosis, and its potential risk factors. Prevalence of infection was determined by ante-mortem lingual palpation of pigs and serological assay through antigen ELISA, while the risk factors for T. solium cysticercosis and taeniosis were determined by administration of a standard questionnaire at household level to respondents by face to face interview. A total of two hundred and ninety nine households and three hundred and two pigs were sampled in this study. One member of the household familiar with the day to day management of the pigs was interviewed on the risk factors. Porcine cysticercosis was found to be prevalent amongst the free range pigs in the district 5.6% (22/392). The household prevalence by lingual palpation was 7.36% and for pig prevalence while the household sero-prevalence by Ag-ELISA was 46.9% (84/179) and individual pig prevalence 43.34% (101/233). Farming was the predominant occupation (79.3%; 237/299) and a high proportion of farmers (88%; 263/299), kept pigs for sale. The pigs were mainly tethered all year round, (98%; 293/299) during the planting season, 98.3% (294/299) growing season and 98.3% (294/299) the harvesting season. Almost half of the respondents (46.9%; 140/299) stated that they fed their pigs on kitchen left over and pasture while 25.7% (77/299) respondents fed the pigs on kitchen left over, sweet potatoes and pasture. None of the farmers supplemented their pigs with commercial feeds. Those households practicing home slaughter of pigs without official meat inspection were 13.98% (27 out of 193 households that consumed pork). The number of homes without latrines was one hundred out of one hundred and ninety nine (51.8%; 155/299). Pig farming in Homa Bay District is mainly free-range, with only 1.5% (5/299) households housing the pigs and most farmers keeping between one and six pigs. More than half of the respondents (61.2%; 183/299) stated that they had at least one household member shedding tapeworm segments in stool. None of the respondents had knowledge on the transmission of T. solium and had seen and recognized Cysticercus cellulosae cysts in pork. It was concluded that porcine cysticercosis is prevalent in free range pigs in Homa Bay District. No latrine use was the only risk factor found to be significantly associated with the presence of T. solium cysticercosis (χ2 = 15.94, p = 0.00008, Odds ratio (OR) = 3.56). The presence of homesteads lacking latrines and failure of people to use the available latrines alongside presence of free roaming pigs were found to be contributing to the maintenance and spread of the parasite. Community education on the cause, mode of transmission, economic and social impact and methods of control of porcine cysticercosis infections is recommended in Homa Bay District.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectPorcineen
dc.subjectCysticercosisen
dc.subjectPigsen
dc.subjectHoma-bay districten
dc.subjectKenya.en
dc.titlePrevalence of porcine cysticercosis in free range pigs and Associated risk factors in homa-bay district, kenya.en
dc.typeThesisen
local.publisherDepartment of Veterinary Pathology, Microbiology & Parasitology Faculty of Veterinary Medicine University of Nairobien


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