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dc.contributor.authorKamanja, Jane k
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-27T06:34:33Z
dc.date.available2019-11-27T06:34:33Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://erepository.uonbi.ac.ke/handle/11295/107371
dc.description.abstractNutrition is a fundamental pillar of human life and its nutrient requirements vary with age, gender and physiological conditions of an individual. Poor nutrition can lead to a range of health problems for first time antenatal mothers, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, overweight and obesity. Inadequate nutrition of pregnant mothers is a key contributing factor for stillbirths to the growing foetus prior to the onset of labour. The objective of this study was to to to assess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of anteassess the knowledge and practices of antenatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutritionnatal maternal nutrition by first time mothersby first time mothersby first time mothersby first time mothersby first time mothersby first time mothersby first time mothersby first time mothersby first time mothersby first time mothersby first time mothersby first time mothersby first time mothersby first time mothersby first time mothers. The study was a cross-sectional descriptive design to collect primary data from the respondents. The The The samplesamplesamplesamplesample was selected using was selected using was selected using was selected using was selected using was selected using was selected using was selected using was selected using was selected using was selected using was selected using was selected using was selected using was selected using was selected using serialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical samplingserialogical sampling. A total of 139 first time antenatal mothers were selected from those attending the Obstetrics and Gynecology clinic of Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) in Nairobi. One nutritionist working at the Obstetrics and Gynaecology clinic of KNH participated in the study as a Key Informant. Structured questionnaires and Key informant interview guide were prepared. A research assistant was recruited and trained on data collection and recording.The questionnaire was pretested using a selected sample of fourteen first time antenatal mothers from the clinic. Data was analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20 software. Cross tabulations, one way ANOVA and independent t-test were applied to test whether there were significant differences between two or more groups or samples at a selected probability level of 0.05. The results showed that 52.5% of the mothers were between 26-35 years and 43.2% between 15-25 years. Majority of the mothers, 77% were married. Mothers who had acquired college education were 63.3%, and 30.9% had acquired secondary education only. The gestation age range of 25- 40 weeks had the highest number of mothers at 66.2%, followed by the range 13-24 weeks at 20.1%. In the occupation category, 38.1% of the mothers were housewives and 33.1% were on salaried employment. Mothers earning a low income were 52.5% and the middle income earners were 47.5%. Majority of the mothers, 76.3% knew the meaning of a balanced diet and 23.7% of the mothers did not know the meaning. On general knowledge of the nutrients that are components of a balanced diet, the mothers scored; Carbohydrates 59.7%, Protein 66.9%, Vitamin A 40.4%, Vitamin C 41.7%, Vitamin D 33.1%, Vitamin B12 34.5%, Folate 21.6%, Iron 36%, Calcium 38.8%, and Zinc 16.5%. In associations between socio-demographic characteristics and knowledge, older mothers in the 36-49 age category were more knowledgeable on balanced diet as shown by the anova value of p=0.044. Mothers who had college education were more knowledgeable on balanced diet with p value of p=0.001, carbohydrate p=0.001, protein p= 0.003, vitamin C p=0.001, Iron p=0.001 and calcium p=0.001. However, mothers of middle and higher socio-economic status had higher knowledge mean scores than those of lower socio-economic status. The consumption of foods providing different nutrients was moderate. In conclusion, the study has shown that first time antenatal mothers have poor knowledge of maternal nutrition which depends mainly on age, occupation and level of education. Older mothers, salaried mothers and those educated to college level have the highest mean knowledge in the categories of age, occupation and education respectively. Finally, mothers of middle and higher socio-economic status have higher knowledge mean scores than those of lower socio-economic status. The consumption of foods providing different nutrients is moderate, thus the practice of antenatal nutritional knowledge as determined by food frequency consumption is moderate probably indicating that the meals for first time mothers are fairly well nutritionally balanced. These findings highlight the disconnect between the low level of knowledge of first time antenatal mothers and the moderate nutritional practice indicating that the practice does not depend on the knowledge. Nutritional education ought to be intensified to the first time antenatal mothers by isolating them as a group during antenatal clinic visits, and educate them comprehensively. This will eventually improve the knowledge levels of first time antenatal mothers.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Nairobien_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectKnowledge and Practices of Antenatal Maternal Nutritionen_US
dc.titleKnowledge and Practices of Antenatal Maternal Nutrition by First Time Mothers: a Case of Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobien_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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